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Derelict property is brought back to life

A derelict property in Boston has been transformed into a modern home thanks to a joint partnership between Boston Mayflower and Boston Borough Council.

The bungalow in Rose Place is the first to be refurbished as part of a new scheme which aims to bring derelict and run-down properties back into use.

The project began after a joint bid for government funding from the two organisations, which secured £192,000 from the Affordable Homes Programme.


Bathroom before - Rose Place Displays a larger version of this image in a new browser window Bathroom after - Rose Place Displays a larger version of this image in a new browser window
Bathroom at Rose Place before and after renovation

Kitchen before - Rose Place Displays a larger version of this image in a new browser window Kitchen after - Rose Place Displays a larger version of this image in a new browser window
Kitchen at Rose Place before and after renovation

This will enable 24 long-term empty properties in the local area to be revamped over three years.

Matthew Spittles, Boston Mayflower's Director of Operations, said: "It is very rewarding to see what was previously a run-down property being improved to a high standard and about to become someone's new home.

"Boston Mayflower is delighted to be working with the borough council to help bring empty private sector properties back into use and provide additional accommodation for those in housing need, while reducing the eyesore of properties standing empty for long periods of time."

Martin Haldhous, who lives near the refurbished bungalow, said: "The work done on it has made a major improvement to the area.

"We hope this continues into the future."

A Boston Borough Council spokesman said: "We hope this is the first of many empty properties that are successfully returned to use under this partnership.

"Nationally there are 700,000 empty properties. It is the role of local government and responsible housing providers to improve the functioning of the market and get as many of these homes as possible back into use - as quickly as possible.

"This is an example of the scheme working. If there are any other properties out there owned by individuals who are unsure about how to bring them back into use please contact the council."

To qualify for the scheme a property must have a residential planning use (non-commercial) and have been empty for a minimum of six months.

Under the scheme, properties will be brought up to Decent Homes Standard and leased to Boston Mayflower for between five and 10 years.

They are then let at an 'affordable rent', with Boston Mayflower doing all required capital works (for example, re-wiring, installation of new kitchens/bathrooms, etc).

On completion Mayflower is responsible for repairs and management costs, while owners are responsible for the property's building insurance.

At the end of the leased term Mayflower give the owner back a property that has been maintained and is immediately ready for further occupation.