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Cost of Living

With significant rise in the cost of living we know that some households will be struggling financially, emotionally or because they need practical advice and help. Here is some key information on what support is available and how to access it. As new schemes, advice and support becomes available this page will be kept updated.

Boston Market

Information about trading on Boston Market and how to apply for a stall

Boston Market

Boston Market operates in the Market Place every Wednesday and Saturday throughout the year.  In addition, the Bargate Green Car Park hosts a Market every Wednesday that includes a traditional auction with sales commencing at 10 am.

Boston market is a recognised tourist attraction in its' own right; with a large number of stalls offering a diverse and attractive range of goods, services and fresh local produce such as fresh fruit and vegetables, fish, meat, cheese, plants and flowers, toys, gadgets, fabrics, sweets, cakes, cards, household goods and clothing.  There's also an opportunity to have a drink and a tasty snack from one of the outdoor catering vendors.

Boston Market - open for business and offering visitors a great outdoor shopping experience.

Market traders

To apply for a stall on Boston Market, read the Markets Policy and complete the online booking form.

For queries, email the markets team.

Charity Stalls

A stall can be made available on the market every Saturday, for use by charities and local organisations.

This can be used to sell products to raise money for the charity; or to raise awareness.

Charities and organisations are permitted one free charity stall per year; additional bookings (up to four in total per year) will be charged at the standard market stall rent.

To apply for a charity stall complete the online booking form.

History of Boston Market

Trading fairs or "marts" have been held in Boston since at least the 12th Century - the earliest historic record of a fair or "mart" is in 1132. It ran from St. Botolph's Day (12th June) to 24th June. In 1218 a Patent was granted for Boston's Fair. The earliest maps of Boston date from that time and the "Market Place" is indicated on them in its current location.  Once a year the London courts would close so that everyone would have the opportunity to visit Boston during the May Fair, at that time goods which were rare, such as spices and wines, could be bought fresh from the port. The town flourished and Boston Port was recognised as second only to London. 

In 1545 Boston obtained its Charter of Incorporation from Henry VIII, via his son Edward VI. On 1st June, John Robinson took office as the first Mayor of Boston. The 12 aldermen were sworn in and the Recorder and Town Clerk appointed. Amongst his other roles the Mayor was declared "Clerk of the Market".

The original document, beautifully illustrated and with its impressive royal seal, is kept in the Guildhall in South Street.  The charter contains the following reference. "We have granted also... unto the said Mayor and Burgesses, and their successors, that they and their successors, for ever, shall have a free Market twice a week, that is to say, upon the Wednesday and Saturday..."